How Much Can You Pawn A TV For?

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incontent300_1Another great question.

First you should know that not all pawn shops will take TV’s in. There are couple good reasons for that that vary from just wanted to avoid electronics all the way to having a bad history with stolen TV’s come through the door for pawn.

Assuming your local pawn shop will accept a TV for a loan, there’s a lot of various factors that go into deciding how much they will loan you for one – and it’s the usual suspects.

If you’ve been reading this blog for any length of time than you know how important things like brand names, condition and completeness are.

TV’s are no exception.

How Does A Pawn Shop Look At Your TV?

Pawn shops will typically look at a very important facts before deciding how much to pay you for your TV. Some of the things they look at are:

  • How Old Is It?
  • What Brand Name Is It?
  • What Technology Is It? (LCD, LED, Plasma)
  • How Big Is It?
  • How Complete Is It? (original remote, paperwork, etc.)
  • What Kind Of Condition Is It In? (scratches, dings, dents, etc.)

Once they have gone over some basic details for your television they will then follow their own in-house rules for determining it’s value.

Those rules will typically be based on things like:

  • How Many Of A Similar Style TV Do They Have?
  • How Much Can They Sell It For?
  • Will It Be Difficult To Store or Take Up A Lot Of Space?

How Much Will A Pawn Shop Pay You For A TV?

Typically speaking, if it’s a newer TV (less than 2 years old) and one flat screen you can reasonable expect to get the following prices based on size and condition.

Less Than 26 Inches

Depending on the TV’s condition and completeness you can expect to get between $20-$50 for it. If it’s missing parts or has obvious physical defects you can expect less.

Between 26 and 42 Inches

If your television is between 26 and 42 inches, in good condition and is complete than you can expect to get between $75 and $200 for it.

Bigger Than 42 Inches

Televisions larger than 42 inches are a special exception and should be looked at on a case-by-case basis. Typically speaking you will be looking at $150 and up for a good brand name TV that is complete and in good condition.

The Nerd’s Experience

tv_250When you are talking about making a loan against your TV there are some common problems that people run into.

First – they almost always forget the remote or the little pedestal stand that they TV sits on. It’s really important to bring both of these items with you, although some pawn shops will still accept TV’s missing either one or the other of these.

Second – Wipe the TV down real quick before you take it in. Removing finger prints and other marks from the television before the pawnbroker looks at it can help make sure that you get the most out of it possible.

Third – Make sure all of the various ports and inputs work. It’s not uncommon for one of the plugs to stop working on TV’s and while this may not be a big deal if you never use it, a pawn shop may not take the TV in if everything doesn’t work properly. So take a few minutes and check the TV out to make sure that everything is in good working order so that you don’t waste a trip by taking it down only to find out that they won’t accept it.

That’s About It…

That will do ti for this post. If you have anymore questions or comments about pawning your TV leave them for me in the comment field below and I’ll be happy to help you in any way I can.

Thanks for everything,

The Head Nerd

Brian has managed a pawn shop in a suburb of Cleveland, Ohio for 6 years. Happy to help with any questions you might have, feel free to reach out to him on Facebook or Twitter.